Walk this way

An often overlooked part of competition day, there’s no doubt that course walking is a real skill. However, you don’t have to jump as many rounds as a Whitaker to learn the tricks of the trade.

Finding your feet

Walking your course gives you a great opportunity to take a good look around the arena before you start focusing on what you’re jumping. It’s important to physically walk your course, rather than just point out the fences in order.

Work out any areas where you can save time – reducing the risk of time penalties, or handy in a timed section or jump-off – and spot places where you should take a wider turn to get the perfect line. Similarly, if your horse is green it’s handy to look out for any banners or particularly spooky fillers, as you may need to give him a little reassurance.

TOP TIP: Bear in mind that the more you worry about fillers, the more likely your horse is to have a look. Ride positively, but try not to panic on the approach.

When the going gets rough

While many venues are fortunate enough to have surfaced arenas to hold their jumping on, you won’t be so lucky everywhere you go. Walking the course gives you a super opportunity to get to grips with the ground and any undulations on course, so you’ll be prepared to adjust your horse’s canter where needed. Fences approached downhill will need a more contained canter than those ridden uphill, for example.

Where your round has been preceded by inclement British weather, you’ll likely find the going will get deep in places. You might need to take a different line, perhaps jumping slightly off centre, to avoid the mud. Walking the course is the prime opportunity to consider this.

TOP TIP: Set out two poles with three of your steps between them. If your horse canters through comfortably, this is the length of his stride. Play around with the distance between the poles until you find the perfect length for your horse so you’ll know how a distance will ride when you walk courses in future.

Double trouble

On course, a one-stride double will walk on eight of your strides, and a two stride should walk on 12. This accounts for two of your strides on both take-off and landing, too.

If the combination walks slightly shorter for your horse, you’ll need to ride a more contained canter to meet the second part in the right place. Equally, a short-striding horse may need some encouragement to move on over the ground. Consider the type of fences that make up the combination, too. An upright first element and an oxer out of the combination will require a contained canter in, then positive riding through the middle. However, the opposite will need a powerful, but not rushed, approach and for you to encourage your horse to shorten his stride to jump out clear over the upright.

For all your equestrian needs visit bridlewayequestrian.com 

Mark it up!

Get to grips with your dressage test and give your marks a boost with our tips

This month, we help you find the key to riding a quality dressage test and giving your marks a leg up. Whatever’s giving you trouble, we’ll cover all angles to get a great dressage test out of you and your horse.

  1. Absolute accuracy

Many riders throw away marks by not being accurate, so ensuring you are is a great way to stand out and put yourself above the competition. Any movements performed at a marker should happen as your shoulder passes it. This might mean you need to start asking a little earlier if your horse is behind your leg, or half halt to balance him beforehand. Practise this by riding transitions at your markers until you can be sure your horse will respond as soon as you ask him a question, as this will help you ride exactly as the test dictates, gaining you those handy extra marks.

  1. Walk this way

A pace that’s often forgotten, your horse’s walk is still an important part of your dressage test. Encourage him to march on, taking the rein forward even when you’re warming up or cooling down, as this sets the precedent for all your work. With double marks available for the free rein walk, make sure you allow your hips to swing with your horse’s movement and gradually loosen the rein to push him forward and stretch down. If you drop the rein too quickly, you’ll find his stretch will be inconsistent, and he may throw his head up. Then, make sure you don’t lose any of that impulsion when you then pick him back up again. He should track up and seek the contact in all three of his paces, so be disciplined and maintain that dedication whatever the gait.

  1. Give and take

Introduced at even the lowest levels of dressage, a good give and retake can be a tough trick to tackle. Initially, you’ll only be required to give one rein, and you may find it easier to practise on the long side to start with. You could ride a 10m circle first to help him use his hocks and come off the forehand, then proceed up the long side and have a go at your give and retake. Get used to riding him off your leg and seat, alternately giving your reins at random during your schooling session. You’ll quickly learn when you need to put a little more leg on or stay a bit quieter in your seat to maintain that steady outline. Gradually build up to trying on a circle, ensuring that your horse can maintain the bend by himself using your inside leg. This will then ensure that your horse is between both your legs when you go on to give and retake both reins.

Practising at home and implementing this tips throughout your test are super ways to boost your marks this competition season. Discipline is key with whatever you’re doing, so get used to riding a quality walk and create those good habits now. There’s nothing worse than feeling unprepared by a brand new movement you haven’t seen before, so practise your give and retakes throughout your sessions so they become second nature.

For all your equestrian need visit bridlewayequestrian.com

Your guide to show rugs and coolers

Our guide to show rugs and coolers will ensure you’re kitted out for the competition season.

The world of rugs is vast and full of options, but our guide will have you show-ready in no time. From super-smart show rugs to lightweight coolers, find the ideal rug for you and your horse’s needs.

Show Rug vs. Cooler

Both show rugs and coolers offer great practical benefits for you and your horse:

Coolers:

  • Highly efficient at wicking moisture and sweat away
  • Made with lightweight technical or mesh fabric
  • Breathable
  • Quick drying

Show Rugs:

  • Wicking
  • Lightweight coverage
  • Smart style
  • Multipurpose
  • Protection against dust and flies
  • Perfect for layering on cold days

Coolers

As their name suggests, coolers are designed to help your horse cool down, so they’re perfect for your horse post-workout. Just as you need time to catch your breath without getting chilly after exercise, your horse needs a little help to prevent him from cooling down too quickly. Even in the summer, a cooler can be a great help for maintaining your horse’s ideal body temperature, whether on the journey back from competing, after a fast hack, or a visit to the gallops.

Whilst the materials used may vary, coolers all have one thing in common – breathability. They’re expertly designed to wick away moisture without your horse cooling down too fast. This prevents muscles from getting stiff or sore from tensing against the cold.

Mesh Scrim Coolers:

Mesh fabric is super lightweight and great for cooling your horse on warmer days. It wicks away moisture and dries quickly too, regulating your horse’s temperature and preventing chilling.

Waffle Coolers:

Waffle fabric is hardwearing and designed to provide a buffer against the cold, while wicking away moisture. This makes waffle coolers a practical choice for travelling.

Show Rugs

Show rugs help keep your horse looking neat and tidy as you travel and prepare for your latest competition.

Usually made of a light material, show rugs offer a balance between warmth and style. A good quality rug will be hardwearing enough to withstand use while travelling, but soft to keep your horse comfortable.

If your horse is prone to ruining all the hard work you put into plaiting his mane, choose a smart show rug with a detachable neck for additional protection.

Sheets

Ideal for keeping your horse spotless. They’re hardwearing and light enough to prevent over-heating but provide a little warmth for those chilly summer evenings or when he’s freshly bathed.

Fleece Rugs

Lightweight and smart, fleece rugs are not only great for shows and travelling, they’re useful for cooling, drying and stable wear too. The soft fleece fabric wicks away sweat to keep your horse dry and comfortable.

Quilted Rugs

With thermal properties, quilted rugs are ideal on colder show days. Soft to touch with a bonded lining that wicks away moisture, these rugs are also ideal for travelling, drying and stable wear.

Discover our full range of rugs and coolers on bridlewayequestrian.com

 

It’s Show(ing) Time!

Showing Season is upon us! If you’re taking the plunge and entering your first ever show this summer, this blog will help you and your horse feel ready to shine.

Showing is all about preparation – from your horse’s fitness routine and building that all-important top line, to perfect plaits, last-minute touch-ups and ring etiquette. As you get ready for your first show, our top tips and essentials will help cover what you need to know.

Show ring shine

Good health and nutrition is key to having a horse who positively shines, but there’s a whole lot more to good turnout. Unless you’re showing a native type, ensure his mane is pulled or trimmed to a suitable length for plaiting. We’d recommend that you do this at least a week before your show to give the mane time to settle.

The day before your show, treat your horse to a bit of pampering and give them a full bath – make sure you pay particular attention to any white markings! If your horse is prone to rolling, a lightweight sheet will help to keep him clean overnight without overheating. A Universal Sheet or Waffle Cooler are great choices for this as their wicking properties offer safe cooling too. Once you’ve finished cleaning your horse, make sure your your grooming kit is clean and ready to take with you for any last minute touch-ups your horse might need on the day.

Essential Kit list

If you’re able to pack the lorry the night before, you’ll help take some of the pressure off getting ready. Here’s our handy list of things you might need to take:

  • Spare headcollar and leadrope
  • Water container and two buckets (one for drinking and one for washing)
  • Grooming kit, including sponges, conditioning spray and plaiting kit
  • Cooler rug
  • Haynet
  • Saddle (with a close fitting plain coloured numnah if required)
  • Plain brown bridle
  • Tweed or navy jacket (depending on your class)
  • Appropriate standard riding hat with velvet cover and hairnet
  • Beige or canary breeches
  • Shirt and tie or plain coloured stock
  • Long riding boots (keep them smart by using a boot bag)
  • Show cane (if using)
  • Plain coloured leather gloves

Top Tip

Grooming kit bags with lots of pockets are really handy as they keep all your brushes organised and ensure everything is easy to find.

On the day

On the morning of your competition, clean off any stains and section his mane ready for plaiting. The number of plaits will depend largely on the length and shape of your horse’s neck – but 9-11 is a good starting point.

Top Tip

Don’t condition your horse’s mane if you plan to plait as it will make the hair slippery.

When you arrive at the showground, check in with the secretary to collect your number and check which arena your class is in. Allow plenty of time to warn up your horse and get him settled in the exciting showground atmosphere.

When it’s time to go in, remember these etiquette essentials…

  • Always leave one-and-a-half to two horse’s lengths between your horse and the horse in front.
  • Never overtake the horse in front of you. Either ride deep into the corner to create more space or circle away and find a bigger gap amongst the other horses.
  • Keep an eye on the steward so that you’re clear when they instruct you to trot and canter.
  • Wait to be called into line, then watch the other competitors ride their individual show and plan yours – making sure you show trot and canter on each rein.
  • When it’s your turn, step forward from the line before riding a halt transition and saluting the judge.
  • At the end of your show you should also halt and salute before returning to your place in the line up.

Most of all, make sure you enjoy your first showing adventure with your horse!

Best of luck!

10 Years of Bridleway Equestrian

Horses are at the heart of what we do.

Back in 2008, Bridleway Equestrian began as the vision of independent equestrian businesses. They wanted to share their equestrian experience and passion by creating a brand that truly understood the needs of horse and rider. By 2009, the concept was a reality and Bridleway Equestrian has continued to grow and reflect the aims of these retailers for the last decade.

Our Products

Everyone at Bridleway is passionate about horses and this helps us ensure that everything we develop is designed with the equestrian in mind. From over reach boots to winter riding tights, everything we create is designed to meet the needs of horse and rider. Whether it’s for rider, stable or field, we work hard to create and innovate products that serve their purpose well.

Over the last decade we’ve refined our ranges and brought in some great new additions. From our popular print rugs, to our seasonal rider clothing collections, we wanted to highlight some of our favourite things.

Rugs:

Back in 2015 we launched the first of our fun print rugs. Available on turnout and stable rugs, this horseshoe pattern led the way for all of our other exciting prints. Our two 2018/2019 duck prints (Fun Duck and Hunter Duck) proved very popular! Keep an eye out for our next print rugs, which will be released for Autumn/Winter.

Horseshoe print rug – 2015/16

As well the new prints, this year our turnout rugs have also benefitted from the addition of leg gussets. This super practical addition will help your horse move more freely when he’s galloping in the field.

Accessories:

Our best-selling product is our Quick Fit Over Reach Boots. They offer hardwearing, comfortable protection for your horse and are great value too, so it’s easy to see why they’re so popular! Originally only available in four colours, these popular boots and their Fleece Trimmed alternative now come in nine eye-catching colours. Very handy if you’re looking for a pair to go with your favourite matchy-matchy sets!

Quick Fit Over Reach Boots

Visibility

Rider safety is very important and high-visibility gear has always been a key part of our range. What began as a small collection of yellow visibility horse products has developed into a broad range of products for horse and rider.

Bridleway Yellow Exercise Sheet

Following feedback from retailers we decided to take a new direction for our hi-viz range. Research into the effectiveness of hi-viz colours showed that the best colour for standing out against green backgrounds, such as hedges or fields, is orange. So, in 2017 we brought out a new range, Visibility, which had a great range of orange accessories to kit out horse and rider from head to toe!

Visibility Gear for horse and rider

Rider Clothing

Bridleway Equestrian’s clothing ranges are designed with the busy equestrian lifestyle in mind. We understand that you want to look and feel great whether you’re mucking out or schooling your horse.

Our seasonal clothing collections ranges are stylish, practical and have something for every rider. These capsule collections offer coordinated colours and patterns to ensure that riders are comfortable and kitted out to tackle all weather. For our latest collection, mint and lilac colours are paired with a cool dark grey for a colour palette that’s fresh and fun.

Bridleway 2019 Colour Palette

For the 2019 collection, we’ve given our popular baselayers an upgrade. Still made with quick drying fabric and flat lock seams, these new baselayers now feature a short sleeve option, ¼ zip neck and a sporty contoured shape.

Here’s to the next 10 years!

We’re proud of how Bridleway Equestrian has grown over the last decade and we’re excited to continue innovating for the future. We’re already working on our next range of new products for horse and rider so keep an eye out online or at one of our fantastic retailer stores for their arrival.

Welcome to the family

Buying your first horse is an exciting time, but how can you prepare for his arrival? Here are some of our top tips.

You’ve found your perfect horse, and your vet has just called to say he’s passed his vetting with flying colours. Congratulations – the search is finally over and the countdown to your new horse’s move-in date is underway.

With the clock ticking, it’s time to think about what needs to be in place before you unload him in his new home. We’ve put together your ultimate first-time horsey shopping list to help give you and your new four-legged friend the best possible start together.

Food first

Horses spend the majority of their time eating forage – up to ten hours daily, in fact – so enabling this will be an important step in preparing for your new arrival. Find out whether hay is included in your livery package or, if not, ask your yard owner if they can recommend a local hay or haylage supplier.

Even if you plan to change your horse’s bucket feed, ask his previous owner what he eats and stock up on it. Dietary changes need to be made gradually over a couple of weeks to maintain gastric health, so it’s important not to switch to his new ration overnight.

TOP TIP

As with hay, bedding may also be included in your livery package, or you’ll need to make your own arrangements. Check with your horse’s previous owner to find out if he requires a dust-extracted variety.

What’s included?

If your horse comes with tack and rugs, this will reduce the amount of horsey shopping you need to do, although it’s not a bad idea to check all his items over for signs of wear and tear.

If he doesn’t come with tack, you’ll have to get a new saddle professionally fitted by a master saddler.  Ask you yard owner for recommendations, or check the Society of Master Saddlers registry.

If you need to buy or replace rugs, you’ll find a fantastic range on Bridleway’s website, from fly rugs to turnout rugs and coolers.

Did you know?

If your horse’s previous owner is keeping his bridle, why not call out a professional bridle fitter to find his perfect match. For a range of Bridleway bridles, click here.

Bon voyage

The day’s arrived, and you’re ready to pick your new horse up. In order to get him home safely, you’ll need a…

Some new horse owners encounter difficulty loading their horses, but that can be down to having a new handler. Look out for signs of tension, such as high head carriage and attempts to avoid the vehicle, and always be prepared to allow a little extra time coaxing him onto the ramp – rushing a horse who’s showing signs of nervousness rarely ends in your desired result.

Settle down

It can take horse a few weeks to settle in a new yard with new rules, handlers and companions, so it’s important not to put unnecessary pressure on him as he acclimatises to his new routine. It might be that you avoid riding him for a week or so, which may feel frustrating. However, in the future you’ll have all the riding time in the world, so why rush him?

For everything you’ll need for your new horse, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

 

5 ways to boost your horse’s summer coat

Spring is just around the corner – which usually means getting lost under a mountain of your horse’s loose hair. Make his coat transition a piece of cake with our top tips.

This time of year, you might find yourself wishing you’d just clipped your horse’s whole coat off. All it takes is a hint of warmer weather to fill the air with winter hairs – covering you, your clothes and your whole yard in the process.

Shedding season has its frustrations, but it’s important to remember that your horse’s coat plays a huge role in protecting his skin, keeping him warm and dry, and it can also give you a valuable insight into his wellbeing. A healthy horse has a beautiful, shiny coat because he has all the nutrients he requires to function – a dull, patchy or flaky coat might suggest he some kind of nutritional deficiency. Therefore, it pays to give the condition of his coat the attention it deserves and to do your bit to keep it looking and feeling its best. Here are five ways to help your horse shed his winter fluff and bring out the best in his summer coat.

1. Bath time

Bathing your horse is a great way to help him shed loose hair. However, if you’re worried about stripping the natural oils from his coat, try rubbing him over with a hot, damp cloth to dislodge some fluff and minimise any reducing of his waterproofing.

2. Go naked

When the weather’s warmed up, let your horse dislodge some of his winter hair himself by turning him out rugless. The shedding process can make horses feel itchy and although he might need a thorough groom after, he’ll appreciate the chance to have a roll and a scratch.

3. Supplement savvy

A shiny coat starts from within, and your horse requires protein, fats, minerals such as zinc and copper, and vitamins to grow healthy hair. Most of these can be found in general purpose feed supplements, while fats and proteins can be found in alfalfa or balancers. Oil is also a popular feed additive to promote coat health but it’s calorie-rich, so be mindful of how much you feed, especially if you’re watching your horse’s weight.

4. Worm-free zone

Internal parasites, such as worms, rob your horse of essential nutrients for optimum health, which can have a knock-on effect on his coat. Making sure he’s following a comprehensive worming plan will help mitigate this risk

5. Snug as a bug

Following a long grooming session or a full bath, your horse might appreciate a full-necked rain sheet to replace the waterproof coat oils lost in the process. Check out Bridleway’s rug range to find your horse’s perfect match.

For all your equestrian needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

Be your horse’s therapist – massage techniques that work

Like us, you probably feel that riding’s the best medicine money can buy – albeit pretty pricey, especially when on repeat prescription. You might come back from a hack relaxed and happy, but have you ever thought about giving something back to your horse? And no, we don’t just mean treats and fuss. Appealing to him as they may be, your horse could also really benefit from a bit of DIY massage. Here’s how to get started.

The benefits

While DIY massage shouldn’t replace your horses regular visits from a qualified equine massage therapist, using similar techniques can help:

  • Alleviate tension after exercise
  • Improve circulation
  • Aid suppleness and strength
  • Increase range of motion
  • Develop muscle tone

Here are some easy exercises for you to try.

Effleurage

In French, effleurage means ‘to skim’, which is effectively what you’ll be doing – moving your hands over your horse’s skin to warm up the muscles and prepare them for massage.

Keeping your hands in a relaxed position, use your palms to stroke slowly in the direction of your horse’s hair with a firm touch. Have one had placed on his body at all times while you skim with the other.

Petrissage

Used to go deeper into the muscle, alleviate tension and increase circulation, this technique is the ideal next step in your DIY massage and is best used on well-muscled areas such as your horses neck, saddle area and hindquarters.

Using the heel of your hand, place pressure on a muscle while moving in an upward motion, then gradually work your way along the muscle in this fashion. You can use your bodyweight to increase pressure and help refine your movements.

Percussion

This technique consists of a rapid, repetitive tapping that works deeper into your horse’s muscles and is a great circulation-boosting method. Again, percussion can be used on the neck, hindquarter and saddle areas, taking care to avoid any bonier parts of your horse.

There are a few different percussion techniques you can use. These include…

  • Cupping – making a rounded, cup shape with your hands and placing them lightly on your horse’s sides, lifting and dropping them in a regular rhythm as if you were patting him
  • Clapping – using the same rhythm as above, but flatten your hands
  • Hacking­ – repeat the same rhythm again­, using the side of your hand to apply the pressure. 

Each of these percussive techniques will have a different effect, and you horse may prefer some to others. You should introduce it gradually and practice on yourself first, so that you learn how it should feel.

Compression

This technique is helpful for releasing areas of tension, as it uses constant pressure to soften muscle. Horses tend to really enjoy this ­– you might even find that yours falls asleep!

Simply use your whole hand or arm to press on a muscle, holding the pressure until you feel your and sink into it slightly as it relaxes.

For all your equestrian needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.co.uk

Winter training tips from Bridleway Equestrian

Winter training exercises to get you and your horse ready for spring

If, like many, your horse has been enjoying a bit of a break over the winter, you might be hoping to kick-start the year with some productive time in the saddle. Here are some simple-but-effective exercises for you to try.

Exercise 1: Fitness first

Before asking your horse to tackle a long and difficult schooling session, it’s important you make sure his fitness levels are up to the task – particularly if he’s been completely out of work for a few weeks. It might mean three, four or more weeks of purely hacking, but it could mean the difference between your horse having a complete and successful competition season or picking up an injury along the way.

Once your horse is hacking comfortably for an hour or more a day with plenty of trot and canter work, incorporating hillwork will help boost his fitness. It works and strengthens all areas of his body, and combining it with transitions will go a long way to improving his muscle tone, too.

Try cantering up a hill, walking back down and repeating. Combined with the additional intensity of going uphill, these bursts of intensity followed by recovery – also known as interval training – will help strengthen your horse’s respiratory system and build him up to the sustained cardiovascular efforts he’ll have to make in competition.

Top tip: vary your hillwork by occasionally walking and trotting up hills as well as cantering, otherwise your horse may start to anticipate canter at the bottom of them.

Exercise 2: Side to side

Once your horse has attained a level of fitness that will allow you to school him for a sustained period, incorporating leg-yield in walk, trot and canter will help him become more flexible and supple through his shoulders, back and pelvis, while encouraging him to come through from behind in order to make the effort to cross his legs while maintaining his rhythm.

Start by asking for leg-yield from the three-quarter line to the track, and when you’re both comfortable, try from the track to the three quarter line, continuing straight for a few strides before leg-yielding back. To add a further challenge, try to reach the centre line as you leg-yield down the arena long side.

Exercise 3: Making shapes

If you’re hoping to get some jumping outings under your belt, cracking the code to the perfect canter and approach is a key part of your training. You can achieve this by riding a simple rectangle. This will help you achieve and maintain an active rhythm, while encouraging you to use your inside and outside aids evenly and engaging your horse’s hindquarters underneath him.

Working between the track and the centre line, place a marker just inside the track at M and F, and just inside the centre line at D and G. Place a pole horizontally at X. Each marker should prompt you to turn as if you’ve reached a T-junction – a 90° angle to follow the line of the rectangle shape. Focus on using your outside leg to prompt him to turn, rather than pulling him round with your inside rein. Try in walk first, before progressing to trot and canter, and try swapping your pole for a small jump.

For all your horsey needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

 

 

 

Winter feeding tips

Not sure about where to start with feeding your horse this winter? Our top tips will make organising his menu a breeze

Winter has arrived – shorter days, diminished grazing and, for many horses, more time in the stable means a complete change in routine as the cold weather rolls in. As your horse’s lifestyle adapts, so too do his dietary requirements and you’ll probably find yourself tweaking his daily ration to suit his altered hours of turnout and level of activity. Sound complicated? It needn’t be. All that’s required is a little consideration of his requirements and how winter changes the way you address them.

Fibre first

Fibre should make up the bulk of your horse’s diet, and his primary source of this particular nutrient forage – preferably ad-lib grass, hay or haylage. With reduced winter grazing and more time indoors, you need to ensure your horse is eating enough forage to keep his digestive system running smoothly, as insufficient quantities can lead to issues such as gastric ulcers.

To maintain his weight, your horse needs to consume 1.5 to 2% (dry matter) of his bodyweight in dry matter forage daily. With many paddocks containing little to no grass over winter, this needs to be replaced with good-quality hay or haylage. It’s a good idea to weigh out your horse’s winter forage ration to take the guesswork out of making up his haynets and put you more in control of maintaining a healthy weight for him.

Top tip

Horses have evolved to naturally lose a little condition – or ‘drop off’ –  over winter in preparation for the sugary grass in the spring. If your horse is going into winter a touch overweight, use the season to your advantage. Try turning him out in fewer or no rugs to encourage him to burn more calories keeping warm.

Nutrition mission

Reduced grazing means your horse will consume lower levels of vitamins and minerals from the grass – and what he does manage to nibble on will have a much lower nutritional value than in the summer months. Adding a comprehensive, general purpose vitamin and mineral supplement or balancer in his bucket feed at the recommended rate will cover all bases and ensure he gets the essential nutrients he needs at the right levels.

Top tip

Is you horse facing stable boredom? Why not inject a little fun into the way he eats his forage? Try giving him a forage block to nibble at, hide some carrots in his haynet, or give him several small piles or nets of forage to keep him moving.

Back to the grind?

If you’re planning to reduce your horse’s workload – maybe you’ve scheduled in a few weeks off for him ­– his daily calorie requirement will also be reduced. This could mean that his current amount of bucket feed will give him a calorie surplus, which will ultimately lead to weight gain. It might be that your horse can thrive on forage, chaff and a vitamin and mineral supplement or balancer alone for a time, but make sure you don’t cut his concentrated feed ration overnight – reduce the amount he eats gradually over at least a week.

For all your equestrian needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.com