Category Archives: Tips

Mark it up!

Get to grips with your dressage test and give your marks a boost with our tips

This month, we help you find the key to riding a quality dressage test and giving your marks a leg up. Whatever’s giving you trouble, we’ll cover all angles to get a great dressage test out of you and your horse.

  1. Absolute accuracy

Many riders throw away marks by not being accurate, so ensuring you are is a great way to stand out and put yourself above the competition. Any movements performed at a marker should happen as your shoulder passes it. This might mean you need to start asking a little earlier if your horse is behind your leg, or half halt to balance him beforehand. Practise this by riding transitions at your markers until you can be sure your horse will respond as soon as you ask him a question, as this will help you ride exactly as the test dictates, gaining you those handy extra marks.

  1. Walk this way

A pace that’s often forgotten, your horse’s walk is still an important part of your dressage test. Encourage him to march on, taking the rein forward even when you’re warming up or cooling down, as this sets the precedent for all your work. With double marks available for the free rein walk, make sure you allow your hips to swing with your horse’s movement and gradually loosen the rein to push him forward and stretch down. If you drop the rein too quickly, you’ll find his stretch will be inconsistent, and he may throw his head up. Then, make sure you don’t lose any of that impulsion when you then pick him back up again. He should track up and seek the contact in all three of his paces, so be disciplined and maintain that dedication whatever the gait.

  1. Give and take

Introduced at even the lowest levels of dressage, a good give and retake can be a tough trick to tackle. Initially, you’ll only be required to give one rein, and you may find it easier to practise on the long side to start with. You could ride a 10m circle first to help him use his hocks and come off the forehand, then proceed up the long side and have a go at your give and retake. Get used to riding him off your leg and seat, alternately giving your reins at random during your schooling session. You’ll quickly learn when you need to put a little more leg on or stay a bit quieter in your seat to maintain that steady outline. Gradually build up to trying on a circle, ensuring that your horse can maintain the bend by himself using your inside leg. This will then ensure that your horse is between both your legs when you go on to give and retake both reins.

Practising at home and implementing this tips throughout your test are super ways to boost your marks this competition season. Discipline is key with whatever you’re doing, so get used to riding a quality walk and create those good habits now. There’s nothing worse than feeling unprepared by a brand new movement you haven’t seen before, so practise your give and retakes throughout your sessions so they become second nature.

For all your equestrian need visit bridlewayequestrian.com

It’s Show(ing) Time!

Showing Season is upon us! If you’re taking the plunge and entering your first ever show this summer, this blog will help you and your horse feel ready to shine.

Showing is all about preparation – from your horse’s fitness routine and building that all-important top line, to perfect plaits, last-minute touch-ups and ring etiquette. As you get ready for your first show, our top tips and essentials will help cover what you need to know.

Show ring shine

Good health and nutrition is key to having a horse who positively shines, but there’s a whole lot more to good turnout. Unless you’re showing a native type, ensure his mane is pulled or trimmed to a suitable length for plaiting. We’d recommend that you do this at least a week before your show to give the mane time to settle.

The day before your show, treat your horse to a bit of pampering and give them a full bath – make sure you pay particular attention to any white markings! If your horse is prone to rolling, a lightweight sheet will help to keep him clean overnight without overheating. A Universal Sheet or Waffle Cooler are great choices for this as their wicking properties offer safe cooling too. Once you’ve finished cleaning your horse, make sure your your grooming kit is clean and ready to take with you for any last minute touch-ups your horse might need on the day.

Essential Kit list

If you’re able to pack the lorry the night before, you’ll help take some of the pressure off getting ready. Here’s our handy list of things you might need to take:

  • Spare headcollar and leadrope
  • Water container and two buckets (one for drinking and one for washing)
  • Grooming kit, including sponges, conditioning spray and plaiting kit
  • Cooler rug
  • Haynet
  • Saddle (with a close fitting plain coloured numnah if required)
  • Plain brown bridle
  • Tweed or navy jacket (depending on your class)
  • Appropriate standard riding hat with velvet cover and hairnet
  • Beige or canary breeches
  • Shirt and tie or plain coloured stock
  • Long riding boots (keep them smart by using a boot bag)
  • Show cane (if using)
  • Plain coloured leather gloves

Top Tip

Grooming kit bags with lots of pockets are really handy as they keep all your brushes organised and ensure everything is easy to find.

On the day

On the morning of your competition, clean off any stains and section his mane ready for plaiting. The number of plaits will depend largely on the length and shape of your horse’s neck – but 9-11 is a good starting point.

Top Tip

Don’t condition your horse’s mane if you plan to plait as it will make the hair slippery.

When you arrive at the showground, check in with the secretary to collect your number and check which arena your class is in. Allow plenty of time to warn up your horse and get him settled in the exciting showground atmosphere.

When it’s time to go in, remember these etiquette essentials…

  • Always leave one-and-a-half to two horse’s lengths between your horse and the horse in front.
  • Never overtake the horse in front of you. Either ride deep into the corner to create more space or circle away and find a bigger gap amongst the other horses.
  • Keep an eye on the steward so that you’re clear when they instruct you to trot and canter.
  • Wait to be called into line, then watch the other competitors ride their individual show and plan yours – making sure you show trot and canter on each rein.
  • When it’s your turn, step forward from the line before riding a halt transition and saluting the judge.
  • At the end of your show you should also halt and salute before returning to your place in the line up.

Most of all, make sure you enjoy your first showing adventure with your horse!

Best of luck!

Welcome to the family

Buying your first horse is an exciting time, but how can you prepare for his arrival? Here are some of our top tips.

You’ve found your perfect horse, and your vet has just called to say he’s passed his vetting with flying colours. Congratulations – the search is finally over and the countdown to your new horse’s move-in date is underway.

With the clock ticking, it’s time to think about what needs to be in place before you unload him in his new home. We’ve put together your ultimate first-time horsey shopping list to help give you and your new four-legged friend the best possible start together.

Food first

Horses spend the majority of their time eating forage – up to ten hours daily, in fact – so enabling this will be an important step in preparing for your new arrival. Find out whether hay is included in your livery package or, if not, ask your yard owner if they can recommend a local hay or haylage supplier.

Even if you plan to change your horse’s bucket feed, ask his previous owner what he eats and stock up on it. Dietary changes need to be made gradually over a couple of weeks to maintain gastric health, so it’s important not to switch to his new ration overnight.

TOP TIP

As with hay, bedding may also be included in your livery package, or you’ll need to make your own arrangements. Check with your horse’s previous owner to find out if he requires a dust-extracted variety.

What’s included?

If your horse comes with tack and rugs, this will reduce the amount of horsey shopping you need to do, although it’s not a bad idea to check all his items over for signs of wear and tear.

If he doesn’t come with tack, you’ll have to get a new saddle professionally fitted by a master saddler.  Ask you yard owner for recommendations, or check the Society of Master Saddlers registry.

If you need to buy or replace rugs, you’ll find a fantastic range on Bridleway’s website, from fly rugs to turnout rugs and coolers.

Did you know?

If your horse’s previous owner is keeping his bridle, why not call out a professional bridle fitter to find his perfect match. For a range of Bridleway bridles, click here.

Bon voyage

The day’s arrived, and you’re ready to pick your new horse up. In order to get him home safely, you’ll need a…

Some new horse owners encounter difficulty loading their horses, but that can be down to having a new handler. Look out for signs of tension, such as high head carriage and attempts to avoid the vehicle, and always be prepared to allow a little extra time coaxing him onto the ramp – rushing a horse who’s showing signs of nervousness rarely ends in your desired result.

Settle down

It can take horse a few weeks to settle in a new yard with new rules, handlers and companions, so it’s important not to put unnecessary pressure on him as he acclimatises to his new routine. It might be that you avoid riding him for a week or so, which may feel frustrating. However, in the future you’ll have all the riding time in the world, so why rush him?

For everything you’ll need for your new horse, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

 

Be your horse’s therapist – massage techniques that work

Like us, you probably feel that riding’s the best medicine money can buy – albeit pretty pricey, especially when on repeat prescription. You might come back from a hack relaxed and happy, but have you ever thought about giving something back to your horse? And no, we don’t just mean treats and fuss. Appealing to him as they may be, your horse could also really benefit from a bit of DIY massage. Here’s how to get started.

The benefits

While DIY massage shouldn’t replace your horses regular visits from a qualified equine massage therapist, using similar techniques can help:

  • Alleviate tension after exercise
  • Improve circulation
  • Aid suppleness and strength
  • Increase range of motion
  • Develop muscle tone

Here are some easy exercises for you to try.

Effleurage

In French, effleurage means ‘to skim’, which is effectively what you’ll be doing – moving your hands over your horse’s skin to warm up the muscles and prepare them for massage.

Keeping your hands in a relaxed position, use your palms to stroke slowly in the direction of your horse’s hair with a firm touch. Have one had placed on his body at all times while you skim with the other.

Petrissage

Used to go deeper into the muscle, alleviate tension and increase circulation, this technique is the ideal next step in your DIY massage and is best used on well-muscled areas such as your horses neck, saddle area and hindquarters.

Using the heel of your hand, place pressure on a muscle while moving in an upward motion, then gradually work your way along the muscle in this fashion. You can use your bodyweight to increase pressure and help refine your movements.

Percussion

This technique consists of a rapid, repetitive tapping that works deeper into your horse’s muscles and is a great circulation-boosting method. Again, percussion can be used on the neck, hindquarter and saddle areas, taking care to avoid any bonier parts of your horse.

There are a few different percussion techniques you can use. These include…

  • Cupping – making a rounded, cup shape with your hands and placing them lightly on your horse’s sides, lifting and dropping them in a regular rhythm as if you were patting him
  • Clapping – using the same rhythm as above, but flatten your hands
  • Hacking­ – repeat the same rhythm again­, using the side of your hand to apply the pressure. 

Each of these percussive techniques will have a different effect, and you horse may prefer some to others. You should introduce it gradually and practice on yourself first, so that you learn how it should feel.

Compression

This technique is helpful for releasing areas of tension, as it uses constant pressure to soften muscle. Horses tend to really enjoy this ­– you might even find that yours falls asleep!

Simply use your whole hand or arm to press on a muscle, holding the pressure until you feel your and sink into it slightly as it relaxes.

For all your equestrian needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.co.uk

Winter training tips from Bridleway Equestrian

Winter training exercises to get you and your horse ready for spring

If, like many, your horse has been enjoying a bit of a break over the winter, you might be hoping to kick-start the year with some productive time in the saddle. Here are some simple-but-effective exercises for you to try.

Exercise 1: Fitness first

Before asking your horse to tackle a long and difficult schooling session, it’s important you make sure his fitness levels are up to the task – particularly if he’s been completely out of work for a few weeks. It might mean three, four or more weeks of purely hacking, but it could mean the difference between your horse having a complete and successful competition season or picking up an injury along the way.

Once your horse is hacking comfortably for an hour or more a day with plenty of trot and canter work, incorporating hillwork will help boost his fitness. It works and strengthens all areas of his body, and combining it with transitions will go a long way to improving his muscle tone, too.

Try cantering up a hill, walking back down and repeating. Combined with the additional intensity of going uphill, these bursts of intensity followed by recovery – also known as interval training – will help strengthen your horse’s respiratory system and build him up to the sustained cardiovascular efforts he’ll have to make in competition.

Top tip: vary your hillwork by occasionally walking and trotting up hills as well as cantering, otherwise your horse may start to anticipate canter at the bottom of them.

Exercise 2: Side to side

Once your horse has attained a level of fitness that will allow you to school him for a sustained period, incorporating leg-yield in walk, trot and canter will help him become more flexible and supple through his shoulders, back and pelvis, while encouraging him to come through from behind in order to make the effort to cross his legs while maintaining his rhythm.

Start by asking for leg-yield from the three-quarter line to the track, and when you’re both comfortable, try from the track to the three quarter line, continuing straight for a few strides before leg-yielding back. To add a further challenge, try to reach the centre line as you leg-yield down the arena long side.

Exercise 3: Making shapes

If you’re hoping to get some jumping outings under your belt, cracking the code to the perfect canter and approach is a key part of your training. You can achieve this by riding a simple rectangle. This will help you achieve and maintain an active rhythm, while encouraging you to use your inside and outside aids evenly and engaging your horse’s hindquarters underneath him.

Working between the track and the centre line, place a marker just inside the track at M and F, and just inside the centre line at D and G. Place a pole horizontally at X. Each marker should prompt you to turn as if you’ve reached a T-junction – a 90° angle to follow the line of the rectangle shape. Focus on using your outside leg to prompt him to turn, rather than pulling him round with your inside rein. Try in walk first, before progressing to trot and canter, and try swapping your pole for a small jump.

For all your horsey needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

 

 

 

Christmas with Bridleway Equestrian

With just over a month to go until Christmas, the team at Bridleway Equestrian have their tinsel and mince pies ready to go! To ensure you’re as prepared as possible for the holiday season, we’ve put together some fab gift ideas that will be perfect for the special horse or equestrian in your life (or just a great gift for yourself!)

For those who love a little bit of glitz

Both horse and rider can enjoy some glitz and glamour this Christmas with our sparkly style suggestions!

For the glamourous rider

Spoil them with a new pair of glitzy breeches, to add that little bit of extra luxury to their riding outfit. We suggest the Kinver Breeches, which feature gold embroidery and a matte floral silicone seat, or our Mendip Breeches, which have stylish silver glitter star print knee grips. Throw in a Sparkle Hat Cover in either royal, navy or pink to complete the look!

For the horse who loves to shine

Why not treat them to a cosy Fleece Lined Headcollar? With its attractive silver or gold sewn design your horse will look super elegant! Alternatively, the Classic Diamond Quilted Saddlecloths (available in Black, Navy or White) look effortlessly smart, and their gold cord trim provides an extra touch of sophistication.

For Matchy-Matchy enthusiasts

We all know them. You’ll never see this horse or pony in anything less than the perfect coordinated combo. Why not wrap them up a new matchy set? Our Signature range includes saddlecloths, bandages and fleece saddlecovers in five fabulous matching colours.

For the naughty pony

Have you got a cheeky horse who makes catching him seem more like you’re playing a game of tag? Choose a practical gift like the Break Free Headcollar, and you’ll not only be getting him something lovely and colourful, but you’ll have treated yourself to an easier life. With its reflective strips you’ll be able to spot your horse better at low light even if he’s playing hide and seek in the field.

For the spoilt pony

Does your horse have his own special stocking at Christmas? Well then, this category is probably for you! Alongside the carrots, why not treat your horse to something a little special. A sophisticated leather headcollar is always a winner. Choose between plain leather, leather with a nameplate, or our elegant Cowdray Headcollar and your horse will definitely look super smart. Fancy something with a bit more colour? Treat your horse to a new turnout rug –  there’s lots of options guaranteed to bring some fun to your horse’s field.

For those on a budget

Part of a Secret Santa with your horsey pals? Here are some great suggestions for under £15:

Become a dressage maestro with these top training exercises

We all know achieving dressage success is no free-walk on a long rein in the park. It takes time, patience and productive training to achieve the marks you want. If you’ve found yourself in a bit of a schooling rut lately, never fear – follow these simple exercises to get your horse moving in a forward rhythm, a supple frame and with an elastic contact.

Warm-up: Long and low

Encouraging your horse to warm up in a long, low frame – stretching throughout his body with an extended neck – means you can coax him into a forward rhythm while asking him to seek the contact. Don’t start with your reins at washing-line length, though – allow him to gradually take the rein down as you work, incorporating simple shapes such as 20m circles and 5m loops to give him an active contact to work into and to occupy his mind. Don’t worry if he’s doesn’t have a beautifully arched neck, as you’re aiming for a forwardness and feeling your horse at the end of your rein. Besides, a curve in the neck doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve achieved a good contact!

Exercise 1: Bend and listen

This serpentine exercise is a real test of your warm-up. If your horse is moving forward and seeking the contact correctly, you should be able to gradually pick up a shorter rein and maintain that lovely, elastic feeling with an active step. Your job is to maintain this feeling around the curves of your serpentine and for your trot-walk-trot transitions over the centre line.

Start on either rein and establish an active trot and with horse listening to you. Preparing your turns is key, so make sure your line of vision anticipates the movements you’re about to make, your inside leg supports the turn, and your outside leg maintains impulsion and guards against falling out. Meanwhile, your outside hand should permit the stretch to the inside through his neck.

Before your transition, half-halt to prepare your horse and remind him to keep seeking the contact before asking him to come forwards to walk, keeping your core engaged and your leg secure to prevent hollowing. When you ask for trot again, make sure you don’t throw away the contact and keep looking for your next turn. Next, step things up by trying the exercise in canter.

Wrapping it up: Super circles

In order to ride a correct 10m circle, especially in canter, you’ll need a horse who’s forward enough to maintain his rhythm, supple enough to follow the curve of the circle through his body and accepting enough of the contact to guard against rushing, breaking and falling out. If you’ve not done this exercise before, start with a 15m circle and work your way down.

To ride a correct ten-metre circle, you need to leave the track just after A, touch D at the top of your circle and re-join the track again just before A. You might find you need to use more leg than on your serpentine curves, but don’t let this encourage you to collapse your position or throw away your reins – focus on riding your horse in a way that allows him to move forward and bend around the circle without rushing.

Heading to a dressage competition soon? Get yourself kitted out with Bridleway’s range of jackets, saddlecloths and more, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

Handling the Heat – 10 Tips for Better Summer Riding

The UK is currently experiencing the longest heatwave it’s had in five years. Over lots of cool water and an ice cream or two, Bridleway’s team have been discussing how we, and our horses, have been coping with this beautiful but troublesome weather.

Here are our top 10 tips to help you handle the heat when riding this summer:

  1. Change your routine
    Ride in the coolest parts of the day, avoiding the midday sun. Get up early or wait a bit longer in the evening before riding to make sure you and your horse don’t overheat when you’re out. Consider stabling your horse during the hottest part of day too, as this will protect them from the sun and pesky flies.
  2. Use fly spray AFTER you tack up
    A good fly spray is a lifesaver for horse and rider in the summer months, as it is the peak season for horseflies and midges. However, remember to only apply to your horse’s coat after you’ve tacked up – fly spray under a confined area, like the saddle, can cause irritation when your horse sweats.
  3. Choose breathable fabric for your horse
    Even when riding during the cooler parts of the day, keeping your horse dry and cool is important. By choosing a saddlecloth and girth that are made with a breathable or wicking fabric, your horse will stay comfortable. Saddlecloths made from a quick-dry fabric will draw away moisture from your horse and keep him cool. Plus, an ergonomic girth like the Contour Comfort Girth allows greater airflow and reduces moisture, minimising the risk of rubbing or chafing.
  4. Protect yourself
    Whether you’re riding in an open arena, hacking out, or just doing yard work, remember to keep yourself protected too. Stay in the shade where possible, regularly top up your sun cream, and wear breathable clothing, like riding tights or a base layer. The base layer’s moisture wicking properties will keep you feeling fresh, and longer sleeves, whilst sounding counterproductive, will protect your skin from the sun and do a better job at keeping you cool than short sleeves.
  5. Stay hydrated
    Whilst long hacks aren’t advisable during the hottest parts of the day, if you are out for a while, take supplies with you in a handy bum bag. A bottle of water and an energy bar will keep you going and help replace the nutrients and water you’ll lose when you sweat. Offer your horse water on return from your ride and don’t forget to have a drink yourself.
  6. Use a fly veil
    Your horse’s ears are a sensitive spot that flies love to attack. Keeping them covered with a fly veil can protect them from biting insects and have the added benefits of blocking noise and looking good too (especially when paired with a matching saddlecloth!).
  7. Avoid still or stagnant water
    From puddles to ponds, areas of still water are a breeding ground for midges. If your usual hack takes you near a pond, try and find an alternative route to stop your horse getting pestered.
  8. Take it steady
    A lack of rain and constant sunshine dries out the ground, making for uncomfortable footing for your horse. When hacking, try to avoid riding too quickly on hard ground or rocky surfaces. Keep to a walk or trot, as this is less likely to cause damage to your horse’s legs. Stick to an arena for your faster paced schooling work.
  9. Don’t forget the cool down
    Once you’ve returned from your ride, take your time to cool your horse down properly. Sponging or hosing him off will help bring his temperature down and a good body wash brush and sweat scraper will help make the process easier. Don’t forget to reapply the fly spray once he’s dry and pop on a fly mask and lightweight fly sheet for extra protection.
  10. Make cooling treats for your horse
    After a warm ride, your horse will need to cool down and stay hydrated. Help him by using handy tricks that encourage him to drink more, such as adding apples for him to bob for in his water trough or bucket. Another fun idea is to create a frozen horse lick with water and chopped up apples and carrot. He’ll be cool, hydrated and kept amused with his very own ice lolly!

Hopefully these 10 tips will help you and your horse stay comfortable and make the most of this British heatwave.

For all of your summer equestrian needs, visit your local Bridleway stockist or  www.bridlewayequestrian.com

Keep him supple with our schooling tips for hacking

Varying your riding environment is an important part of keeping your horse happy and interested in his work – you don’t want to stay at home doing the same things every day and neither would he. Using your hacking time to occupy his mind and work on any schooling issues in a fun, pressure-free environment is really beneficial, particularly if you don’t have easy access to an arena. Here are some tips to get you started

Long and low

Asking your horse to take up the contact and stretch into a long-and-low outline can be an effective warm up. Not only does it encourage him to relax into the contact, he’ll also raise and engage his back, working the muscles that support a correct ridden frame. Be sure to work him gradually down so that contact is maintained – if you just drop your reins, you’ll loose your connection.

Time to flex

Keeping your horse’s body straight and his gait forward, use your rein to ask him to flex from one side, then to the centre, then to the other side. This exercise will warm him up while testing his suppleness and obedience. It’ll also free up his neck, preparing him for any more complex questions you’ll ask of him later.

Side to side

The flat, stable surface of a quiet path is a perfect setting for asking your horse to leg-yield. This movement requires him to use his whole body and reinforces the idea that your leg aid doesn’t just mean go, but can also mean move away. This exercise requires straightness and engagement, so is a good indicator of how well he’s working. It’ll also reveal any corrections you need to make in your riding or his way of going. Make sure you check the path is clear of pedestrians both ways before attempting a leg-yield.

Shoulder showdown

Now he’s warmed up through his neck and back, you can start asking your horse to engage through his whole body by asking for shoulder-fore, Make use of hedges and fence lines to help guide your horse as you ask his front end to bend slightly away while keeping him travelling forwards. However, be sure not to allow him to over-bend.

Going in circles

Coming across an open field out on a hack is a huge bonus because you can use it as a giant school. Take the opportunity to play with the space, performing transitions, circles and changes of bend through serpentine work to encourage suppleness. Be vigilant to falling out, though, as there won’t be any fences to help prop your horse up!

Don’t forget visibility for you and your horse when you’re out and about. For high-viz and everything you’ll need out on a hack, visit bridlewayequestrian.com

Breathe easy – respiratory health explained

Your horse’s respiratory system is a complex part of his body. If he’s in good health, you probably won’t give it a great deal of notice, but respiratory problems can affect his wellbeing and performance, so it’s important to know what to look out for and how to keep him in the best of health.

Signs and symptoms

Your horse is only able to breathe through his nose, so his nostrils are a good place to start. You’ll notice that, when at rest, he takes 12–20 breaths per minute, with barely any movement in his nostrils. This will increase in abnormal conditions – he’ll breathe more rapidly in hot weather or with exercise. Flared nostrils at rest is a sign there’s something wrong.

Nasal discharge is also an indicator of respiratory health. You’ll rarely see any in a healthy horse, although small amounts of a clear, watery substance during or after exercise is normal. However, increased, thick or smelly mucus could indicate an irritation or an infection.

Although many healthy horses cough occasionally, frequent coughing is another common sign that something’s not quite right. If you notice your horse coughing regularly, speak to your vet to get to the root of the problem.

Be in the know 

Problems occur when your horse’s respiratory system is unable to function properly or efficiently. This can be caused by a number of factors, such as…

  • viruses
  • allergens
  • air quality

These factors place stress on his respiratory system, meaning it has to work harder, but there are lots of simple actions you can take to minimise these and help support his health.

Supporting his respiratory health

Knowledge of what can cause stress to your horse’s respiratory system is an important tool in maintaining and supporting it. Many horses are allergic to dust and fungal spores found in hay and bedding, and horses with prolonged exposure can develop conditions such as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). As well as problems associated with ingesting dust and spores, these allergens can also have an impact on air quality, particularly if you have an enclosed, American barn-style yard and an adjoining indoor school.

Management methods to help combat these issues and support your horse’s respiration include…

  • steaming or soaking hay before feeding to minimize dust and spores
  • making sure he’s got clean, high-quality, dust-free bedding
  • improving ventilation on your yard, which could be as simple as keeping the doors open as much as possible
  • ensuring he’s out of the way when you’re mucking out or sweeping up
  • using a specifically-formulated feed supplement to help support a healthy respiratory system
  • maximising his turnout

If your horse seems susceptible to respiratory problems, consider shaking up his management a bit with a couple of these suggestions. It’s worth talking to your vet to help you formulate a management plan.

For all your horsey needs, visit bridlewayequestrian.com